Clare Norman Coaching Associates https://www.clarenormancoachingassociates.com Challenging business leaders and coaches to grow through change Thu, 21 Mar 2019 09:58:34 +0000 en-GB hourly 1 https://www.clarenormancoachingassociates.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/12/cropped-site-identity-32x32.png Clare Norman Coaching Associates https://www.clarenormancoachingassociates.com 32 32 How will you know that your coaching culture is making a difference? https://www.clarenormancoachingassociates.com/how-will-you-know-that-your-coaching-culture-is-making-a-difference/ https://www.clarenormancoachingassociates.com/how-will-you-know-that-your-coaching-culture-is-making-a-difference/#respond Thu, 21 Mar 2019 09:44:49 +0000 https://www.clarenormancoachingassociates.com/?p=3627 In the sixth blog of my “When to Build a Coaching Culture Series” I talk about setting goals and establishing the measures of success. It’s hard to measure the value of time, particularly time to think. If you want to spend money in organisations, you (more often than not) need to prove that it’s money […]

The post How will you know that your coaching culture is making a difference? appeared first on Clare Norman Coaching Associates.

]]>
In the sixth blog of my “When to Build a Coaching Culture Series” I talk about setting goals and establishing the measures of success.
Coaching culture

It’s hard to measure the value of time, particularly time to think.

If you want to spend money in organisations, you (more often than not) need to prove that it’s money well spent.  We don’t build a coaching culture for its own sake – it’s for the benefit of the business, and the business needs to see that benefit.  You can provide them with the evidence of that benefit by identifying measures of success up-front.  What is it you hope to see as a result of coaching, and how will you measure that?

Set your goals

If your goal is to push decision-making down the hierarchy, that’s a tough one to measure with existing organisational measures.  It will need to be self-reported by the leader and/or their people.  You could do a before and after measure, such as “how much time do you spend on decisions and tasks that your team members should be doing?”  Ask it at the start of the coaching and ask again at the end.  In one recent coaching assignment, my client reduced that percentage from 40% to 15%, and he is still working on reducing it further, with the aim of freeing up a full 35% of his time.

If your goal is to reduce the time it takes people to embrace change and get back to productivity, again that’s a tough one to measure because how do you know how fast they would have moved back into productivity without coaching? 

There will be some easier measures, that your organisation perhaps already keeps tabs of, which are high impact side effects if the above outcomes.  For example, lower attrition, higher engagement, decreased absenteeism, less stress related illness.  You may not be instigating coaching specifically to achieve these, but you will almost certainly see improvements.

Decide on the measures of success

Do decide on your measures of success before you commence the programme, so that you can figure out ways to gather the data as you go along.  If you wait until the programme is underway, or finished, you’ve missed an opportunity to shape the coaching in a way that will achieve the outcomes you most want.  Start with the end in mind, as Stephen Covey would say.

I mentioned leading and lagging measures in a previous post. The measures above are all lagging measures, those things you will see as a result of many micro-actions.  Leading measures are those micro-actions that will lead to the lagging measures happening, so it’s as important to measure those so that you can see where tweaks might need to be made to those micro-actions. 

For example, if this is what you are aiming for, how might you measure these micro-actions?

  • Leaders use a coach approach to enable others to think for themselves
  • Leaders use a coach approach to encourage people to do things they’ve never done before
  • Leaders take the opportunity to use a coach approach during every conversation, every interaction, every piece of work

Again, I imagine that these will be self-reported measures, on an individual basis. But you’ll be able to measure the lagging measures at an organisational level.

At some point, you will want to consider how to integrate this into your performance management process, if this is to become an expectation of all leaders.  But that is in the future.  We’re starting small right.

At the heart of all of this is the value of time to think. Tough to quantify, but worth every penny of investment as you’ll get diversity of thought and innovation.

Here are a couple of links to previous supporting blogs in this series…

The post How will you know that your coaching culture is making a difference? appeared first on Clare Norman Coaching Associates.

]]>
https://www.clarenormancoachingassociates.com/how-will-you-know-that-your-coaching-culture-is-making-a-difference/feed/ 0
Where to start with building a coaching culture https://www.clarenormancoachingassociates.com/where-to-start-with-building-a-coaching-culture/ https://www.clarenormancoachingassociates.com/where-to-start-with-building-a-coaching-culture/#respond Thu, 07 Mar 2019 14:41:38 +0000 https://www.clarenormancoachingassociates.com/?p=3615 In the fifth blog of my “When to Build a Coaching Culture Series”, I discuss where to start when build a coaching culture. If you are an individual leader, you can only start with yourself.  So, start there when building a coaching culture. Start asking rather than telling now. If you are responsible for developing […]

The post Where to start with building a coaching culture appeared first on Clare Norman Coaching Associates.

]]>


In the fifth blog of my “When to Build a Coaching Culture Series”, I discuss where to start when build a coaching culture.

If you are an individual leader, you can only start with yourself.  So, start there when building a coaching culture.

Start asking rather than telling now.

If you are responsible for developing leaders, start anywhere.  Don’t overthink your experimentation.  Find three leaders who are willing to learn. In my experience, there are many, many leaders who would love to learn how to develop their people to make more decisions for themselves and to transition faster through change. Offer them this great opportunity to be part of a pilot.

If you are wondering where to find the coach, you have one right here, willing and able to work with you in this experiment.  I’ve done this before, so I know what works, and the pitfalls to avoid.

What are you waiting for?

I know, I know, you probably need some kind of sign-off to commission an external coach, but you can make that happen!  Every organisation is different, so I won’t presume to give you advice in this forum about the best way to get that sign-off, but I could coach you through it, asking you questions that help you to decide on a way forward and deal with your own doubts about making a change.

The post Where to start with building a coaching culture appeared first on Clare Norman Coaching Associates.

]]>
https://www.clarenormancoachingassociates.com/where-to-start-with-building-a-coaching-culture/feed/ 0
Who can build a coaching culture? https://www.clarenormancoachingassociates.com/who-can-build-a-coaching-culture%ef%bb%bf/ Tue, 19 Feb 2019 16:14:08 +0000 https://www.clarenormancoachingassociates.com/?p=3585 In the fourth blog of my “When to Build a Coaching Culture Series”, I discuss who can build a coaching culture. Anyone can start coaching, from any seat.  Anyone can create a ripple effect through the people with whom they use a coach-approach. Have you heard the story about the starfish? Strolling along the edge […]

The post Who can build a coaching culture? appeared first on Clare Norman Coaching Associates.

]]>

In the fourth blog of my “When to Build a Coaching Culture Series”, I discuss who can build a coaching culture.

Anyone can start coaching, from any seat.  Anyone can create a ripple effect through the people with whom they use a coach-approach.

Have you heard the story about the starfish?

Strolling along the edge of the sea, a man catches sight of a young woman who appears to be engaged in a ritual dance.  She stoops down, then straightens to her full height, casting her aim out in an arc.  Drawing closer, he sees that the beach around her is littered with starfish, and she is throwing them one by one into the sea.  He lightly mocks her: “There are stranded starfish as far as the eye can see, for miles up the beach.  What difference can saving a few of them possibly make?”  Smiling, she bends down and once more tosses a starfish out over the water, saying serenely “It certainly makes a difference to this one.”

Zander and Zander in the Art of Possibility (one of my favourite books).


You can make a difference, by focusing on one person at a time.

And who knows, others may follow suit, as they see the difference that it makes.

Don’t wait for someone else to start the trend; or to give you permission.  Why do you need permission to start asking rather than telling?

I hear you….you know you don’t need permission, but it’s just not how it’s done around here.  But do you want to continue to feel that overwhelm, as you keep making decisions on behalf of your people rather than challenging them with questions to help them to think it through? 

Do you want to feel the frustration of never getting to the strategic stuff that you really want to give time to? 

Do you want to feel the challenge of time, but not the challenge of thought? 

Do you want to feel dragged down by change?

No?  Then make that tweak.  Or perhaps commission yourself a coach, so that you can experience it first-hand.  With that experience, you will have a better sense for how to contract for great conversations; how to ask powerful questions; how to listen deeply and notice the essence of what you sense; how to move the other person to action  etc.  Ask your coach to get you into a practice triad (see below) so that you can try out these skills in a safe environment.

Start small

If you are responsible for developing leaders in your organisation, I suggest you start small.  Try some experiments before going full-tilt with a big business case.  Get some evidence from within the organisation.  Here’s how I go about this:

  1. Provide three leaders with an executive coach, with whom they can do some real work on themselves
  2. Pull these three leaders into a triad, with the coach.  The coach lightly teaches them those same skills that he/she has been using with each of them.  The triad then practice together with the coach facilitating the feedback process, so they learn by doing, rinsing and repeating the process to get more and more confident with applying the skills
  3. Each leader then refines the new habit in the workplace by:
  • identifying their personal triggers for coaching in the workplace,
  • experimenting with employees and reporting back successes and obstacles
  • reinforcing the action of the triad members and supporting continuous experimentation

Once you’ve tried it with one triad, you can expand to further triads. 

A word of warning

You may be thinking that this model is impossible to scale and you’ve got hundreds of leaders to train in coaching skills.  You might think that it will be more efficient to train them en masse.  It might be efficient, but in my experience (and according to research by Olivero and Bane , it’s not effective, as a 2 or even a 5 day course (for example) will not create sustainable behaviour change without support on the back end to embed the new learning into the workplace. 

Whatever way you choose to develop those leaders though, start with what success will look like.  How will you measure the success of coaching?   You may have some leading measures and some lagging ones (see link to a previous post).  More on that in a future post.

The post Who can build a coaching culture? appeared first on Clare Norman Coaching Associates.

]]>
What does a coaching culture look and feel like? https://www.clarenormancoachingassociates.com/what-does-a-coaching-culture-look-and-feel-like/ Thu, 07 Feb 2019 11:00:46 +0000 https://www.clarenormancoachingassociates.com/?p=3428 You’ll know it’s time to build a coaching culture when:  Your organisation is going through change (see my previous post) (oh, wait, isn’t that every organisation?!) Decisions are being made at levels that are paid too much for the complexity of those decisions Strategic imperatives that affect the long-term future of the organisation are not […]

The post What does a coaching culture look and feel like? appeared first on Clare Norman Coaching Associates.

]]>

You’ll know it’s time to build a coaching culture when:

  •  Your organisation is going through change (see my previous post) (oh, wait, isn’t that every organisation?!)
  • Decisions are being made at levels that are paid too much for the complexity of those decisions
  • Strategic imperatives that affect the long-term future of the organisation are not getting the attention they need
  • Diversity of thought is not actively sought, leading to lack of innovation
  • Leaders are complaining that they don’t have enough time
  • Individuals are generally disengaged and making minimal effort, despite their high calibre
  • There are complaints of bullying, that appear to be caused by an abrupt command and control leadership style

What will a Coaching Culture feel like?

I’m not going to be Pollyanna-ish and say that a coaching culture will create a totally perfect working environment (because we’re all human), but it will feel very different:

  • The environment will be one of support AND challenge (Daloz) See a previous post about this.
  • Conversations will start with an agreement about what needs to be achieved, what success will be like, and how the participants will work together towards that (STOKRS)
  • Conversations will continue with open questions that enable the person to think for themselves, my previous post about Powerful Questioning can help
  • People will feel heard, really heard not just superficially
  • Conversations will include direct, timely, honest feedback
  • There will be a feeling of progress and learning

What will a Coaching Culture look like?

As a result:

  •  People will regain their performance edge sooner as they transition through the change curve
  • Decisions will be made at the level they should be made at
  • Individuals will feel more fulfilled, challenged and engaged
  • Strategic thinking will be given higher importance and time
  • There will be more diverse thinking and innovation
  • Leaders will feel more fulfilled, challenged and engaged
  • The business will be seen to be growing instead of stagnating

What else have you experienced as a result of creating a coaching culture?

Here’s the previous blog post in this series
Here is the first blog in my Building a Coaching Culture Series

The post What does a coaching culture look and feel like? appeared first on Clare Norman Coaching Associates.

]]>
Want performance to get better? https://www.clarenormancoachingassociates.com/want-performance-get-better/ Tue, 22 Jan 2019 10:30:05 +0000 https://www.clarenormancoachingassociates.com/?p=3417 In the second blog of my “When to Build a Coaching Culture Series”, I discuss how organisations face and instigate change at an increasing rate.  That’s never going to change if they want to survive and thrive.  But despite knowing that change is here to stay, employees still feel a sense of resistance.  Every time […]

The post Want performance to get better? appeared first on Clare Norman Coaching Associates.

]]>
In the second blog of my “When to Build a Coaching Culture Series”, I discuss how organisations face and instigate change at an increasing rate. 

That’s never going to change if they want to survive and thrive.  But despite knowing that change is here to stay, employees still feel a sense of resistance. 

Every time there is even a small change, performance will dip for a while as individuals go through the change curve of betrayal, denial, identity crisis and finally a search for solutions (Pritchett and Associates, Business as Unusual). 

Pritchett and Associates go on to explain these stages:

When to build a coaching culture

Betrayal typically occurs as the changes are announced, or just beforehand when change is suspected. 

At this stage, you are likely to hear things such as:

  • “not again”, “how could they do this?”
  • “after all we’ve been through”
  • “after all the work we’ve done?”
  • “it’s not fair”

At this point energy, and productivity, start to drop.

In denial, people put on the blinders and attempt to pretend the changes don’t exist or will go away.

They keep doing what they have done and hope for the best.  People look busy, but it might not be on the right things.

You might hear or sense things like:

  • “If I just ignore this, it will go away”
  • “It’s just the latest program of the week”
  • “I can wait this out”
  • “Senior management will wake up and see that it won’t work, so I don’t need to do anything”

Managers need to consciously take off their employees’ (and their own) blinders, helping them to recognise that the change is here to stay and that each person is accountable for making the changes successful.

Identity Crisis can be a very emotional time. 

This stage is characterized by people wondering,

  • “Where do I fit into all this?”
  • “Do I even want to fit?”
  • “Is this really what I want to do?”
  • “Will I be able to do it as well as I need to?”
  • “What do I want to do with the rest of my life?”

At this point, energy and productivity are at their lowest but hopefully you are starting to see how coaching might play a part in  to find their own answers. Telling them what to think or feel or do will not work, as they will  push back on mentoring that doesn’t fit their old or blossoming self-concept. 

In the Search for Solutions, a person starts asking;

  • “How do I make it work?”
  • “I think I’ll do OK”
  • “Change can even be fun”

Energy and productivity increase once more.

Whilst that change curve is inevitable (to a greater or lesser degree, depending on the individual and the change), it IS possible to support individuals through it in a way that enables them to learn and grow,and to get back to high performance more swiftly.

That involves using a coach approach.

According to recent research by the ICF and HCI, coaching

“can help individuals, teams and organisations explore resistance, enhance communications, and promote resilience in the face of change”.

When to build a Coaching Culture?

So in answer to this question, it’s imperative to start now, because change is here to stay, and people need help to work through change, and to get out the other side richer for it: richer in skills, richer in understanding of themselves and how they get the best out of themselves; richer in understanding where they can do their best work; richer in understanding where they want to go next.

That’s the individual angle. The business payback is getting back to high performance as soon as possible rather than performance dipping and not recovering. 

This post really answers the why question as well as the when.  We discovered in the last post that one reason for building a coaching culture is to push decisions downwards to the person who is paid to make decisions of that complexity. You can view that post by clicking on this link.

So now we have a second why – to support and challenge people through times of change.  Timing-wise, that’s right here, right now!  I encourage you not to put off learning how to coach, because it really will help you and your crew. 

Must have leadership skill

If you are responsible for developing leaders at your organisation, this is a must-have skill for business results, not a soft skill that’s nice-to-have; so it’s time to figure out where to start building that coaching culture, one small step at a time (more of which in an upcoming post).

The post Want performance to get better? appeared first on Clare Norman Coaching Associates.

]]>
Need to Push Decision-making Downwards? https://www.clarenormancoachingassociates.com/%ef%bb%bfneed-to-push-decision-making-downwards/ Tue, 08 Jan 2019 10:30:25 +0000 https://www.clarenormancoachingassociates.com/?p=3405 Why Build a Coaching Culture? Ask yourself these questions… Do you ever notice yourself feeling overwhelmed by the amount of work you need to get done, with not enough time to get it done?  Do you ever notice how you go straight in to problem solving mode when a team member asks you a question? […]

The post Need to Push Decision-making Downwards? appeared first on Clare Norman Coaching Associates.

]]>
Why Build a Coaching Culture? Ask yourself these questions…

Do you ever notice yourself feeling overwhelmed by the amount of work you need to get done, with not enough time to get it done? 

Do you ever notice how you go straight in to problem solving mode when a team member asks you a question?

Do you ever think that there might be a connection between these two? 

Lack of time is tied to solving others’ problems.

Here’s what I see happening….

An employee asks his or her manager what to do in a situation.  Said manager feels the pressure to have all the answers and/or to move decisions on quickly, so gives an answer.  This is a good short-term fix, as the employee can go away and take action (maybe, if they actually understand the answer fully), and the manager gets to go back to their work. 

But it keeps happening.  The same employee comes back with similar or additional questions.  They get into a habit of feeling that they should ask permission rather than forgiveness.  The amount of time the manager spends on decision-making just keeps on increasing.

Why can’t the employee figure it out for themselves, the manager wonders? 

 “They’re not new anymore, they should know what to do, after all the answers I’ve given them!  I never get around to doing the more strategic thinking that I need to get to, as I’m always helping my team members.  I’m feeling unfulfilled and under-challenged”.

Sound familiar?

 At the same time, the employee is feeling equallyunfulfilled, as he/she just does what they’re told.  They don’t have to think, but that’s leaving them feeling under-challenged. 

You’re both in the same boat, unfulfilled, under-challenged, not able to operate at the level for which you are paid.  It’s a vicious cycle, which is dragging you both down.  The more you answer the questions about decisions they could make for themselves, the more they will come back with more questions, and so it continues.

You, the leader, are feeling tugged in two directions:

  1. From below, by employees wanting advice, direction, decisions
  2. From above, by your leaders wanting them to spend more time on the future of the business

 Look around you.  Do you see that happening around the organisation? Decisions being made at too high a level? Strategic thinking not being given the time it needs?  No diversity of thinking, so little innovation.  Chances are that this is a cultural norm.

But it could be different.  There is another way.

It takes just one small tweak on your part:

Asking instead of telling.

Asking them what they think about the situation and the possible resolutions.  

Yes you might need to ask a series of questions to help them to decide what next step to take; and yes that might take a bit longer than telling them what to do. 

But in the long-term, they’ll stop asking you and start asking themselves.

So stop blaming them for coming to you with their questions.  You are perpetuating that behaviour by always answering those questions, making their brains lazy.  Look to yourself and how you can change that one small behaviour to enable them to change theirs.

Think about the return on that short-term investment of additional time:

  •  You’ll have more time in the long-term to focus on those strategic issues that you are being held accountable for
  • You’ll feel more fulfilled that you have helped someone else to grow
  • You’ll feel more challenged because you are working on those strategic issues
  • Your employees will be getting more done, because they won’t need to wait until they can talk to you
  • They will feel more fulfilled as a result of getting more done
  • They will feel more challenged, as they will be using their brain to solve problems
  • They will be growing, and your succession plan will be much healthier
  • They will feel more engaged, and will be more likely to stick around for longer
  • They will be experiencing a more effective approach to management, that they can then use with their own team members

 Multiply that by all the managers in your organisation and think what a difference that will make to the productivity and growth of the organisation as a whole.  All because you encouraged diversity of thinking and innovative ideas in others. 

Is that enough to persuade you that it’s worth that small tweak, asking instead of telling?

Pushing decision-making down to the level at which those decisions should be made?

Freeing up time for good quality thinking?

Creating diversity of thinking and innovation?

Picking up the pace on performance?

Building a culture of coaching? 

We don’t build a coaching culture for its own sake. We build a coaching culture to meet business needs, for the present and for the future.

The most prevalent business need that I see is the growth of a business, created by the growth of individuals in that business.

After their initial training, the growth of the individuals comes from asking rather than telling.

We are all paid for our capacity to think.  Yet we waste that capacity, if we don’t ask our employees to think.  They aren’t using their brainpower, and we are using our brainpower on things that are beneath our pay grade, rather than on the strategic thinking that we are paid for.

Perseverance is Key

It’s true that not all of your employees will step up at your invitation.  Remember they have formed a habit and it takes a while to unlearn habits and relearn new ones.  So persevere.  But if they still don’t rise to the challenge, it may be time to manage them out of the system or into a better fitting role.

 You can make a difference, even if you are the only person asking instead of telling.  Try it and see what kind of a ripple effect it creates.

 If it helps to get you on the right path, you might want to ask for coaching yourself, to experience the power of questions rather than advice.

Cultures change one person at a time.  Start now and you’ll see the difference in performance that your bosses are expecting of you. 

The post Need to Push Decision-making Downwards? appeared first on Clare Norman Coaching Associates.

]]>
When to Use a Coach Approach ~ Summary: Leader as Coach https://www.clarenormancoachingassociates.com/when-to-use-a-coach-approach-summary-leader-as-coach/ Fri, 14 Dec 2018 12:29:24 +0000 https://www.clarenormancoachingassociates.com/?p=3125 In this series for the Leader as Coach, we’ve looked at multiple conversation points where coaching – or at least a coach approach – will engage your employees more than telling them. In brief, whenever you have any of these conversations, structure them by:  contracting at the start for what you each want to take […]

The post When to Use a Coach Approach ~ Summary: Leader as Coach appeared first on Clare Norman Coaching Associates.

]]>
In this series for the Leader as Coach, we’ve looked at multiple conversation points where coaching – or at least a coach approach – will engage your employees more than telling them.

In brief, whenever you have any of these conversations, structure them by: conversation

    • contracting at the start for what you each want to take out of the conversation

I wish you well in your quest to grow independent, critical thinkers, who can make decisions that you might otherwise have made.  Get more done through others. 

 If you missed any of the series, you can read them all here:

https://www.clarenormancoachingassociates.com/coaching-blog/

The post When to Use a Coach Approach ~ Summary: Leader as Coach appeared first on Clare Norman Coaching Associates.

]]>
Using a Coach Approach Before and After Training ~ Leader as Coach https://www.clarenormancoachingassociates.com/using-a-coach-approach-before-and-after-training-leader-as-coach/ Fri, 07 Dec 2018 12:35:59 +0000 https://www.clarenormancoachingassociates.com/?p=3079 Training alone reaps a 20% change in behaviour.  Training plus coach leads to an 80% change in behaviour. So, we’ll get a much better return on investment from the training that our people attend if we add that extra element before and after. What does that look like? It’s simple: Before the training, ask them: […]

The post Using a Coach Approach Before and After Training ~ Leader as Coach appeared first on Clare Norman Coaching Associates.

]]>
Training alone reaps a 20% change in behaviour.  Training plus coach leads to an 80% change in behaviour.

So, we’ll get a much better return on investment from the training that our people attend if we add that extra element before and after.

What does that look like?

It’s simple:

Before the training, ask them:

  • what are your outcomes for this training?
  • what do you want to be different by the time you finish the training?
  • how will you know you have achieved that by the time you finish the training?
  • how will you make sure that you get what you need?

If there is anything else that you expect them to be able to do differently as a result of the training, then this is the time to add to what they have already said.

After the training, ask them:

  • what did you learn about your intended outcomes?
  • what are you going to do differently as a result?
  • how can I support you in making those changes?
  • how will we know that you’ve been successful in making the changes?  what will we see or hear or feel?

If there is more that you’d like to add about new behaviours that you’d like to support them in implementing, add that now.

Then keep up the conversations.  You’re aiming for a sustained behaviour change, and that takes support and challenge from you to keep them on the path.  It’s so easy to slip back into old habits if they think you aren’t noticing their efforts to make changes.

Here are a couple of previous blogs in this series…

Coaching Upwards ~ Leader as Coach: When to use a Coach Approach

Leaving an Organisation ~ Leader as Coach: When to use a Coach Approach

The post Using a Coach Approach Before and After Training ~ Leader as Coach appeared first on Clare Norman Coaching Associates.

]]>
Coaching Upwards ~ Leader as Coach: When to use a Coach Approach https://www.clarenormancoachingassociates.com/coaching-upwards-leader-as-coach-when-to-use-a-coach-approach/ Fri, 30 Nov 2018 12:37:59 +0000 https://www.clarenormancoachingassociates.com/?p=3077 Using a coach approach can help us to manage our boss as well as our employees, Coaching Upwards.  Each time I have had a new boss, I have sat down with them in the first couple of weeks to talk to them about my needs of them.  I usually start the conversation by saying something […]

The post Coaching Upwards ~ Leader as Coach: When to use a Coach Approach appeared first on Clare Norman Coaching Associates.

]]>
Using a coach approach can help us to manage our boss as well as our employees, Coaching Upwards.  Each time I have had a new boss, I have sat down with them in the first couple of weeks to talk to them about my needs of them.  I usually start the conversation by saying something like:

“I’d like to talk to you about how you can get the best performance out of me in service of our team’s goals”

It usually takes them aback, as they are not used to people being so assertive about their needs.  But once they realise how useful the information is, they settle in for a great conversation about what makes you both tick, and how you can get the best out of each other.

Coaching Upwards is like setting ground-rules.

It means that you have something to refer back to if something isn’t working for you further down the line.

In a coaching conversation this week, one of my clients noticed how he wanted to tell his new boss about his boundaries around work, particularly given the imminent arrival of a new baby at home.  We discussed how he could manage upwards by sharing his needs with his new boss in a way that set his ground-rules and also asked for his boss’ ground-rules.  Win/win, and a great way to start a new relationship.

More opportunity for Coaching Upwards

The other time when using a coach approach can be useful with your boss is when they delegate something new to you and you already feel overloaded.  Don’t whine about it behind their back – have an adult conversation where you lay out all that you have on your plate and ask where this new piece of work fits in terms of priorities.  What needs to wait if this new task is more important or urgent?

Here are a couple of earlier blogs in this series..

Leaving an Organisation ~ Leader as Coach: When to use a Coach Approach

Performance Management ~ Leader as Coach: When to use a Coach Approach

The post Coaching Upwards ~ Leader as Coach: When to use a Coach Approach appeared first on Clare Norman Coaching Associates.

]]>
Performance Management ~ Leader as Coach: When to use a Coach Approach https://www.clarenormancoachingassociates.com/leader-as-coach-performance-management/ Fri, 23 Nov 2018 11:24:54 +0000 https://www.clarenormancoachingassociates.com/?p=3073 Coaching and performance management don’t go together.  There, I’ve said it.  Why not? Because, your employees may not trust you enough to tell you their real desires and needs, or share their vulnerabilities with you, if they think that this might be held against them in the performance management process. Ask Before You Tell Using […]

The post Performance Management ~ Leader as Coach: When to use a Coach Approach appeared first on Clare Norman Coaching Associates.

]]>
Coaching and performance management don’t go together.  There, I’ve said it.  Why not?

Because, your employees may not trust you enough to tell you their real desires and needs, or share their vulnerabilities with you, if they think that this might be held against them in the performance management process.

Ask Before You Tell

Using a coach approach to performance management however, now that’s a different matter.  Using a coach approach means asking first, rather than telling:

  • What’s your analysis of your performance?
  • What did you do well?
  • What would you do differently if you had your time again?
  • Where do you see room for improvement?

Think about it…when someone tells you something constructive about your performance that you already know, you probably do some version of bristling.  It’s not great to hear something you already know.  Strange, but true.  So better to have them tell you so that you can simply agree – or disagree – with the feedback that they are giving to themselves.

I’ve used something like this simple diagram in the past to help them to get prepared.  They might complete one of these for each project that they are working on.  You could also use it in your more frequent check-in conversations to see how tasks are progressing.  After all, we shouldn’t be leaving performance management to the end of the year.  This kind of conversation needs to happen frequently so there are no surprises come the end of the year.

So bite your tongue next time you are in a performance management conversation, and ask before you tell.

Here are links to a couple of my other blogs in the Leader as Coach series which you might like to look at…

Leader as Coach: When to use a Coach Approach ~ Career Change

Leader as Coach: When to use a Coach Approach ~ Leaving an Organisation

The post Performance Management ~ Leader as Coach: When to use a Coach Approach appeared first on Clare Norman Coaching Associates.

]]>